Rutgers School of Public Health has conducted two studies that suggest consumers and employees could face potential health risks at beauty salons.

The findings were published in the Journal of Chemical Health & Safety and in the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

“Both the studies highlighted the need for greater awareness for clients and workers to protect themselves from potential health risks at beauty salons.”

In the first study, researchers surveyed 90 clients who frequented hair and nail salons in three New Jersey counties to assess whether they exhibited skin and fungal diseases.

The research found that 52% of the participants reported dermal or fungal symptoms.

Lead author of the research team Lindsey Milich said: “Clients should ask their stylist or nail technician about the chemical ingredients in the products being used, how they disinfect their tools and the type of ventilation system in the salon.”

In the second study, 68 nail technicians from 40 salons in New Jersey were surveyed. It was found that they received inadequate training in the use of chemicals.

Lead author and associate professor of environmental and occupational health Derek Shendell said: “We found that these nail technicians were being trained but not necessarily in their native language, which raises concerns on how well the technicians understood the information being presented.”

Both the studies highlighted the need for greater awareness for clients and workers to protect themselves from potential health risks at beauty salons.

Lindsey Milich said: “more studies are needed to confirm and expand the findings”.