The Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN)  has suggested that talcum powder products marketed for children should carry a safety warning on the label informing parents to keep the powder away from the nose and mouth to avoid inhalation.

This warning meets the requirements of product labelling in Canada and EU.

Talc serves an abrasive, absorbent, anti-caking agent for bulking or opacifying cosmetic products. It is a naturally occurring mineral consisting of magnesium, silicon and oxygen, and is used in products such as body powder, eyeshadow and face powder.

“Talc serves an abrasive, absorbent, anti-caking agent for bulking or opacifying cosmetic products.”

ASEAN stated that it will ‘monitor any new safety data related to the use of talc in cosmetic products and will take appropriate action and inform the public if necessary.’

Concerns have also been raised about a possible link between talcum powder and ovarian cancer but the ASEAN Cosmetic Scientific Body (ACSB) claimed that no conclusive evidence has been found to establish a link.

Last year, several women filed a lawsuit against Johnson and Johnson over its talc-containing baby powder alleging that the product caused ovarian cancer. Johnson & Johnson has lost six of the seven cases decided so far, reported New York Times.